2020 चे 8 सर्वात मोठे गेम: एक्सबॉक्स, पीएस 4, स्विच आणि पीसी – फोर्ब्स

2020 चे 8 सर्वात मोठे गेम: एक्सबॉक्स, पीएस 4, स्विच आणि पीसी – फोर्ब्स

Translating…

Cyberpunk 2077

Cyberpunk 2077

Credit: CD Projekt Red

Cyberpunk 2077: This thing hits on April 16 after years of hype. This is the next game from The Witcher 3 developer CD Projekt Red, and it promises to be even more ambitious than that already massive title. Based on the Cyberpunk roleplaying games, it’s a sprawling RPG with multiple playstyles, a branching narrative and shades of immersive sims like Deus Ex and Dishonored. Also, Keanu Reeves lives in your head.

I’m nervous about this one: it’s based around a radically different combat system than any of the Witcher games, and a preview I saw at E3 left me a little nervous about the degree to which CD Projekt Red can pull this thing off. Then again, I thought the same thing about The Witcher 3.

Halo Infinite: Don’t call it Halo 6, though from a story perspective it does appear to be Halo 6. Halo Infinite appears to be a kind of soft reboot for the storied shooter franchise, eschewing the numbering convention found in the previous games for something…bigger. What that bigger thing is is still very unclear: we’ve seen a brief teaser featuring an idyllic Halo as well as a strange little cutscene where some guy finds Master Chief in space, but that’s about what we’ve got here.

Halo Infinite has a big job. It’s here to launch the Xbox Series X, but it also has to run on older hardware. The Halo franchise has been in a weird place ever since Halo 5, and this appears to be Microsoft’s big shot at restoring its place as one of the biggest games in the industry.

Last of Us Part 2: This has been delayed a couple of times, but it appears that we are definitely getting this thing on May 29. The Last of Us was the swansong of the PS3, an epic story from Sony’s most valuable developer and a demonstration of just what that machine was capable of in its final year. The Last of Us Part 2 will serve a similar function for the PS4, with one major difference.

The PS5, unlike the PS4, will be fully backwards compatible withe the previous generation. So don’t expect a remastered version for The Last of Us Part 2. Expect, instead, for it to be an odd sort of launch title for PS5, because anyone who owns it on PS4 should theoretically be able to play it on PS5 with graphical enhancements.

Ghosts of Tsushima: This one sort of sneaks in there, as a ninja should. It’s been on our radar for a while, but it’s not one of Sony’s big-name exclusives. It’s a new property from Sucker Punch that seems like it will take a somewhat-grounded look at Samurai combat. I’m hoping for something like Sekiro or Nioh but with difficulty options.

DOOM: Eternal: Another game delayed into 2020, this should still be one of the biggest titles in the Xbox One and PS4’s final year. The original DOOM reboot is beloved by fans and critics alike, and I don’t think anyone really wants much more here than “way more doom”. We’ll see what we get out of it, but the original made waves for it’s fast-paced, brutal combat that nonetheless had a way of taking on a sort of cerebral puzzle quality. We’ll see.

Watch Dogs: Legion: A delay is still possible here, but I expect to see this in 2020. Watch Dogs is a funny franchise: the first entry was heavily hyped but not all that great, and the second was much better but didn’t perform all that well. Watch Dogs: Legion looks nuts. There is no main character, instead you assemble a resistance force in fascistic London out of ordinary citizens called up in extraordinary times. Any random bloke or—is there a female version of bloke? Blokette?—has a backstory, skills and a purpose, and any one of them might either find themselves the star of your story or permanently dead.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons: It’s Animal Crossing, therefore it’s great. This is not a “big” game in the same way as some of these other sprawling, ambitious projects. It is a small game, about living a small, quiet life in a peaceful world of animals. It’s also the first Animal Crossing game on a “home” console, continuing Nintendo’s project of merging its handheld and living room libraries onto one machine. I do not know what 2020 will bring, but I do know that it will be a trying year, particularly in the United States. Animal Crossing: New Horizon is here to offer some respite.

Part of Final Fantasy VII: This has been one of the gaming world’s most-anticipated title since the trees were young. Final Fantasy VII is arguably the most beloved Final Fantasy title of them all, but it still exists as one of those funny artifacts of early 3D games. 2D pixel art games can remain beautiful even decades later, but early 3D games have a bit of a rougher go of it.

Final Fantasy VII remedies that with full-on current visuals, and it looks gorgeous so far. Bear in mind, however, that this is not the whole thing. It’s just the first part in Midgar, and we’ll get the rest…sometime.

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2019 was a weird year for video games, but an awesome one. The year before a new generation tends to be that way: publishers hold back big projects, and instead we get to marvel at projects like Control, Disco Elysium and The Outer Worlds. 2020, however, is going to be a big one. Not only do we have a huge spate of AAA titles to close out the generation, we’ll have the PS5 and Xbox Series X before the year is done. So long as the basic political structures that have sustained the developed world since the end of World War 2 can hold, we should have some great video games to play.

This is most definitely an incomplete list. There are more huge games coming out this year that we know about, and likely even more that we don’t. But here’s 8 of titles I’m looking forward to.

Cyberpunk 2077

Cyberpunk 2077

Credit: CD Projekt Red

Cyberpunk 2077: This thing hits on April 16 after years of hype. This is the next game from The Witcher 3 developer CD Projekt Red, and it promises to be even more ambitious than that already massive title. Based on the Cyberpunk roleplaying games, it’s a sprawling RPG with multiple playstyles, a branching narrative and shades of immersive sims like Deus Ex and Dishonored. Also, Keanu Reeves lives in your head.

I’m nervous about this one: it’s based around a radically different combat system than any of the Witcher games, and a preview I saw at E3 left me a little nervous about the degree to which CD Projekt Red can pull this thing off. Then again, I thought the same thing about The Witcher 3.

Halo Infinite

Halo Infinite

Credit: Microsoft

Halo Infinite: Don’t call it Halo 6, though from a story perspective it does appear to be Halo 6. Halo Infinite appears to be a kind of soft reboot for the storied shooter franchise, eschewing the numbering convention found in the previous games for something…bigger. What that bigger thing is is still very unclear: we’ve seen a brief teaser featuring an idyllic Halo as well as a strange little cutscene where some guy finds Master Chief in space, but that’s about what we’ve got here.

Halo Infinite has a big job. It’s here to launch the Xbox Series X, but it also has to run on older hardware. The Halo franchise has been in a weird place ever since Halo 5, and this appears to be Microsoft’s big shot at restoring its place as one of the biggest games in the industry.

The Last of Us Part 2

The Last of Us Part 2

Credit: Naughty Dog

Last of Us Part 2: This has been delayed a couple of times, but it appears that we are definitely getting this thing on May 29. The Last of Us was the swansong of the PS3, an epic story from Sony’s most valuable developer and a demonstration of just what that machine was capable of in its final year. The Last of Us Part 2 will serve a similar function for the PS4, with one major difference.

The PS5, unlike the PS4, will be fully backwards compatible withe the previous generation. So don’t expect a remastered version for The Last of Us Part 2. Expect, instead, for it to be an odd sort of launch title for PS5, because anyone who owns it on PS4 should theoretically be able to play it on PS5 with graphical enhancements.

Ghosts of Tsushima

Ghosts of Tsushima

Credit: sucker Punch

Ghosts of Tsushima: This one sort of sneaks in there, as a ninja should. It’s been on our radar for a while, but it’s not one of Sony’s big-name exclusives. It’s a new property from Sucker Punch that seems like it will take a somewhat-grounded look at Samurai combat. I’m hoping for something like Sekiro or Nioh but with difficulty options.

Doom Eternal

Doom Eternal

Credit: Bethesda

DOOM: Eternal: Another game delayed into 2020, this should still be one of the biggest titles in the Xbox One and PS4’s final year. The original DOOM reboot is beloved by fans and critics alike, and I don’t think anyone really wants much more here than “way more doom”. We’ll see what we get out of it, but the original made waves for it’s fast-paced, brutal combat that nonetheless had a way of taking on a sort of cerebral puzzle quality. We’ll see.

Watch Dogs: Legion

Watch Dogs: Legion

Credit: Ubisoft

Watch Dogs: Legion: A delay is still possible here, but I expect to see this in 2020. Watch Dogs is a funny franchise: the first entry was heavily hyped but not all that great, and the second was much better but didn’t perform all that well. Watch Dogs: Legion looks nuts. There is no main character, instead you assemble a resistance force in fascistic London out of ordinary citizens called up in extraordinary times. Any random bloke or—is there a female version of bloke? Blokette?—has a backstory, skills and a purpose, and any one of them might either find themselves the star of your story or permanently dead.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons

Animal Crossing: New horizons

Credit: Nintendo

Animal Crossing: New Horizons: It’s Animal Crossing, therefore it’s great. This is not a “big” game in the same way as some of these other sprawling, ambitious projects. It is a small game, about living a small, quiet life in a peaceful world of animals. It’s also the first Animal Crossing game on a “home” console, continuing Nintendo’s project of merging its handheld and living room libraries onto one machine. I do not know what 2020 will bring, but I do know that it will be a trying year, particularly in the United States. Animal Crossing: New Horizon is here to offer some respite.

Final Fantasy VII

Final Fantasy VII

Credit: Square Enix

Part of Final Fantasy VII: This has been one of the gaming world’s most-anticipated title since the trees were young. Final Fantasy VII is arguably the most beloved Final Fantasy title of them all, but it still exists as one of those funny artifacts of early 3D games. 2D pixel art games can remain beautiful even decades later, but early 3D games have a bit of a rougher go of it.

Final Fantasy VII remedies that with full-on current visuals, and it looks gorgeous so far. Bear in mind, however, that this is not the whole thing. It’s just the first part in Midgar, and we’ll get the rest…sometime.